Memory Glass Magnet Tutorial

Hello! I promised a tutorial on the alcohol ink stamped magnet I made, and here it is!   I’ve tried to make it as clear and simple as possible through photographs.  I hope you’ll try it!

If you’ve used alcohol inks before, then you will most likely have the inks, the applicator and felt pads, and alcohol blending solution.  If you’ve never tried alcohol inks, well now you know the basics of what you’ll need to start out! :)   I’ve shown in the picture above, the  Stampbord that I use as the base of the magnet, to which we apply the ink.  The Memory glass (microscope slide glass) is stamped with the image and placed over the Stampbord.  The final size is 2″ x2″.

Let’s start!

  1. USING ALCOHOL INKS ON STAMPBORD (OR ANY NON POROUS SURFACE)

For this project I chose Stream, butterscotch, and Pesto for my color palette.
Drop 3 drops of each onto the felt pad (stuck to the velcro applicator), be careful not to put them on top of each other, as you don’t want a big mud puddle.

2. DAB IT

Dab the applicator onto the board randomly, without dragging it. Leave some white space. It’s better not to cover the surface now, because we will use a blending solution which will spread it in the next step.

3.  BLEND IT

Add 2 or 3 drops of blending solution onto the same felt pad and pounce up and down onto the surface again.  The colors will start to blend together and take on unique marbled shapes.  Now the artist in you can have fun!  You can let the ink blend naturally, adding more blending solution if you need to, or you can smudge or swoosh your felt pad around the surface to change the way it all blends together.  It’s a matter of personal preference, have fun with it!   For the butterfly magnet, I pulled the felt pad around in a circular fashion for a blurred swirling effect.  (See picture at the bottom of the page)

On this one I decided I liked the marble effect the natural blending made and didn’t really touch it after I stamped on the color and blending solution.  You can see the difference, when you look at both next to each other below.

4.  TAPE GLASS EDGES AND EMBOSS

I first taped the edges with this red double sided Terrifically Tacky Tape, using a bone folder or something flat to smooth it on. I did not use my fingers as the edges of the glass can still be a bit rough even though they have been buffed. If you do use your fingers, pat the tape down instead of running your finger across! Flat head tweezers are good to turn down the corners and edges of the tape too.

5. Get your embossing powder ready preferably before you tape your sides.  And have your heat tool ready as well.

Dip your taped sides into the silver embossing   powder, two sides at a time.  I then suggest you hold your glass with something other than your fingers to heat emboss!  Guess why I’m saying that?!  The first time I didn’t, :( and boy does that glass get hot, not to mention your fingers are awfully close to the heat of the tool!! ouch.  Silly me.  I used tweezers to hold it the next times.  It heats up very quickly, so this is a fast process.  All four sides will be done in no time.  A few coats of embossing powder is a good idea. I used silver twice, and clear glassy glaze enamel for the third coat.   It gives the edges a neat soldered look and covers the edges well.

6. STAMP YOUR IMAGE Now that your edges are finished, you can stamp your image using Staz On.   Open images are especially nice with this because you’ll see the background colors through the image.  When stamping your image on glass, apply light, even pressure and be careful not to slide the stamp, or it will smudge your imprint.  Lift the stamp straight up and away from your glass.  I used my heat tool to set the image, even though the stamped side will be facing in and will be protected by the glass.

7. ADHERE YOUR MAGNET

I used Crystal Effects by Stampin’ Up! to adhere the glass to the colored Stampbord, by applying it around the edges, and adhering stamped side down.   Crystal Effects is a 3d transparent gloss lacquer that dries to a strong clear finish.  I find it works well as adhesive in many cases!  ;)

Don’t forget to add a magnet to the back! It’s done!

LINK’S TO OTHER ALCOHOL INK TUTORIALS:

Splitcoastamper’s Alcohol Ink Tin tutorial

Making backgrounds with Alcohol Inks - Simple how-to!

Hope you enjoyed the tutorial!   Have a great weekend!!

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